3 Tips for a Manager to handle Team Peer Pressure

3 Tips for a Manager to handle Team Peer Pressure

  • An Effective Leader or a Manager must know the thin line between promoting a culture of support and team building within the team and avoid coming across as one who is conformed to the peer pressure of the prominent majority.
  • The Hall mark of a successful team is the ability to build up one another recognizing the skills and talents of each to foster the growth of the business.
  • Here are 3 Tips that will help a Team leader deal with Peer Pressure in a team.
  • •Recognize
    A Good Manager will be able to recognise if an individual is being ostracised by majority of a group especially after observing that the individual voiced his or her opinion not in favour of the majority.
  • •Intervene
    Interventions are important to ensure that negative peer pressure does not settle in the team which results in bullying and which may hamper the productivity and performance of the business. A team member must be able to confide and consult the leader at all times when succumbed to Peer Pressure
  • •Cultivate
    A manager who can set expected goals for each team member and is able to promote and utilise positive peer pressure to perform well can cultivate a great organizational culture that helps the business grow.
    Hence a Strong leader who can manage his team well will reap fruits of good will , recognition and growth for himself as well as the team.

Peer Pressure Explored

Peer Pressure Explored

  • Peer Pressure is inevitable. None of us can live as Islands. We all need friends, we all need people we can relate to. People are not machines, they have their likes, their opinions, so it is very much possible that they would want us to join with what they are doing and some of these things could include stuff that we are not comfortable with or that do not agree with our value system.
  • Peer Pressure: Good or bad?
    Peer pressure is not necessarily a bad thing, but it often is a bad thing. I had a friend in college who was thinking of quitting her studies in the final year, but her friends her batch mates managed to coax her out of it and she went on to complete her degree. But more often than not, peer pressure has bad effects. We have so many people who are into substance abuse, into pornography, into unhealthy relationships, all because they were coaxed into these things by their friends.
    I have a friend called Amit. When Amit was a teenager, he went to a party and that night he had sex. Today he is living with HIV aids. One night's giving into peer pressure has led to a lifelong consequence.
  • How do we overcome peer pressure?
    Just say no.
    Now this sounds so easy, but it's not because when you say no, there is every chance that you may lose your friends. So is there something that outweighs this?
    Yes, there is; the life that you have ahead of you. You want to make the best of your life. The best life is the life where you have friends who respect you for who you are, and stick with you when you take a stand for what you believe is right.
    Throughout history, change has come from those who have stood for what they believe in, rather than going with the flow.
    So, the choice is yours. Do you want to be you, or do you want to be the you that someone else wants you to be?
    - Johnny Varghese Professor at Brilliance, Mumbai.

Peers: Cause of pleasures & pains

Peers: Cause of pleasures & pains

  • Memories of a discomforting afternoon more than two years ago came rushing back to me as a friend recently mentioned an unpalatable parent teachers' meeting (PTM) at his daughter's school. I now understand why PTMs scream trouble for most youngsters and they would rather christen it 'Perennial Terror (-inducing) Meets' than a constructive interaction between the two important pillars of their lives - parents and teachers.
  • While almost all teachers at my daughter's PTM were categorical in pointing out that my girl had more than come out of her shell with a huge circle of friends, a couple of them sounded rather alarming. "She hangs out with all the wrong people and thinks it's cool to be casual about everything. Her grades are bound to nosedive," warned one of them. Needless to say, there were fireworks back home. We closely sat down to scrutinise her circle of friends, dissecting their scholastic performance and behaviour.
  • My friend from another city narrated almost an identical scenario wherein the issue of concern was not academic grades but the influence of the peer group. Understandably, the reaction of most parents is also identical - warning their wards to stay clear of their friend(s) in question, obviously leading to substantial heartburn.
  • But come to think of it, why do friends suddenly become so important for youngsters? Psychologists say the meaning of friendship changes as our children get into their teens. While earlier they needed friends as someone to play with, they now want someone to confide in or share their feelings. As parents of teens, it would be helpful to bear in mind that peers give our youngsters a sense of belonging and also an increased sense of self-confidence. Friendship for teens, particularly girls, is a need and is fundamental to how they see themselves.
  • Most teenagers are very supportive of each other and serve as a sounding board for issues such as relationships, school, work and conflict with parents. Though parents, including me, would like to believe they can provide all the emotional support that their teens seek but the fact remains that we cannot always think like them and understand their fears, their insecurities and their reasons for glee or bliss. In fact, research has proved healthy friendship can positively influence the scholastic, social and personal aspects of a teenager's life.
  • Nevertheless, friends can often be judgemental and the cause of heartache too, especially when conflict or alienation occurs. Unfortunately, teen years are also the crucial years for their academics. Parents, therefore, obviously tend to be nervy about wastage of time and unnecessary distractions.
  • Although run-ins with teens are unavoidable, I follow a four-pronged strategy to handle peer issues at home. For one, have frequent frank conversations for it's important to know what's cooking or rotting in her mind. The watchword is to listen generously to your child talk about friends, relationships or worries. Two, teach them strategies to recognise and deal with negative peer pressure, like when to say a polite 'no'. Three, befriend their friends and invite them home and let them do their own things there. And finally, set your own set of rules. If concerned about bad influence, discuss with your child. But watch out this is wet ground as criticism of pals is often taken personally.
  • Finally, it is essential for parents to understand